Rail Delivery Group (UK): 2016 rail fares published – 1.1 per cent average rise is lowest for six years

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With 2016 train ticket prices published today, rail industry leaders have confirmed that fares will rise on average by 1.1 per cent next year, the smallest annual increase for six years.

People can find out the price of new fares and buy tickets online and at ticket offices from today. The 1.1 per cent average increase covers all national rail fares with effect from 2 January 2016.

Paul Plummer, chief executive of the Rail Delivery Group which represents train operators and Network Rail, said:

“We know that nobody likes to pay more to travel by train, especially to get to work, and at 1.1 per cent this is the smallest average increase in fares for six years.

“On average 97p in every pound from fares is spent on trains, staff and other running costs. With passenger numbers doubling in the last 20 years, money from fares now almost covers the railway’s day-to-day operating costs.

“This allows government to focus its funding on building a bigger, better network when the railway is becoming increasingly important at driving economic growth, underpinning jobs, and connecting friends and families.

“As an industry, we are working closer together to deliver better stations, more trains and improved services, and to get more out of every pound we spend.”

CHANGES TO OVERALL AVERAGE FARES 2010-2016:

 

Overall average fares increase

Jan 2010

1.1%

Jan 2011

6.2%

Jan 2012

5.9%

Jan 2013

3.9%

Jan 2014

2.8%

Jan 2015

2.2%

Jan 2016

1.1%

  • Nearly half (47 per cent) of all passenger revenue in 2013-14 came from discounted tickets, up from 38 per cent in 2005-6, whilst the proportion of passenger journeys on discounted tickets has also increased.
  • There were 1.65billion total rail passenger journeys, more than 4.5million a day, in 2014-2015.
  • The huge increase in passenger numbers has resulted in train companies generating extra revenue for the government, contributing almost six times more money to government to support rail investment – up from £400million to £2.27billion.

The ATSB has released its investigation report: Derailment of Sydney Trains Passenger Train 602M near Edgecliff station, Sydney, NSW on 15 January 2014

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 Source: Office of Transport Safety Investigations (OTSI)

At about 1654 on 15 January 2014, a Sydney Trains service made up of two four-carriage Tangara electric multiple units, entered the underground section of the Eastern Suburbs Line under Sydney city centre heading towards its destination, Bondi Junction. Some smoke and a burning smell were apparent emanating from the train at Central station and at all subsequent stations to Bondi Junction. A number of station and train crewing staff were aware of this but the condition was not reported to the appropriate network control officer as required under Sydney Trains’ Network Rules and Procedures.

The train terminated at Bondi Junction where a different driver took control of the train before it departed on its return journey. It then travelled to the next station, Edgecliff. Shortly after departure from Edgecliff, at 1726, the lead bogie of the third carriage derailed due to a broken axle on the leading bogie of the third carriage. A piece of angle iron that became dislodged from the track infrastructure penetrated the floor of the third carriage and entered a space occupied by passengers.

The ATSB found that an unauthorised, non-standard repair had been carried out on the axle in December 1998 or January 1999 which introduced stress initiators, causing a crack to develop which over time propagated to the extent that the axle failed in service.

It was also determined that a number of organisational factors contributed to the incident with examples of poor communication and lack of adherence to procedures and reporting lines leading to the train continuing in service and subsequently derailing.

Sydney Trains and their maintenance contractors undertook an archival document search and determined that seven axles, including the failed axle, had been repaired in the same way. All were immediately removed from service.

Sydney Trains, after conducting its own investigation into the circumstances surrounding the incident, produced a number of safety recommendations which the organisation is considering through its own Safety Action Management procedures.

Safety message
Rail operators should ensure that maintenance procedures are followed and that non-standard repairs comply strictly with an approved variation and do not introduce new risks to operations.

Also, rail operators should review their internal training and communication pathways both within and between business units / operational areas to ensure that critical communication can occur in line with best current Rail Resource Management principle.

Full report: Derailment of Sydney Trains Passenger Train 602M near Edgecliff station, Sydney, NSW on 15 January 2014

News: Unauthorised repairs contribute to Sydney train derailment